Kid Blogs - Blogging in the Classroom, secure & private!
Examples of Blogs K-12 plus administrator blogs
More School Bloggers (great list)

Blogger


How-to signup for blogger from psharkr on Vimeo.








How to create a blog with Blogger video


More Information

Examples of Educational Blogs from Newell-Fonda Community School District

Blogger - Working with Date and Time


play button
play button

Blogger - Posting via Email


play button
play button

WordPress - Uploading Images and Adding them to Your Post


play button
play button

Blogger - Creating Your Blog Template


play button
play button

Blogger - Deleting Your Blog


play button
play button

Blogger - Creating a Blog with Blogger


play button
play button

Blogger - How to Edit Your Posts


play button
play button

Blogger - Creating a Blog Feed


play button
play button

Blogger - Writing Your First Post


play button
play button

Blogger - Previewing Your Blog


play button
play button

Blogger - Working With Blog Settings


play button
play button

Blogger - Adding New Users


play button
play button



Wordpress Blog Directions


This page is about how to sign up for a WordPress blog. For a more general overview about WordPress.com and blogging, please visit the Introduction to WordPress.com page too.

Sign Up & Activate

To get started, you need to sign up for an account. On the first screen, you will be asked for a username, password, and email address. You must agree to the fascinating terms of service, and also select whether you would like a blog URL such as USERNAME.wordpress.com created or if you want to setup a username-only account.
If you choose to create a blog when you sign up, you will be able to choose the blog domain (or blog URL) on the second screen in the sign up process. You cannot change the blog URL once it is created, but you can always just setup a new blog URL on the same account later or you can customize the domain that your readers see by purchasing a domain mapping upgrade. You’ll also see options to set a blog title, language, and search engine privacy on the second screen. All of those options can be changed in the settings pages later.
After you click the Signup button, you will see a page with some additional profile settings. You can add those settings right away or you can change them any time from your profile page later. You will also see the email address you entered printed at the bottom of that page. If you notice that your email is wrong, change the address and click the Update email button.
Next, check your email for your activation link and click on the link to activate your new account. If you don’t receive the email right away, just contact support and we’ll send you the activation link again.

What Next?

Once you have activated your WordPress.com account, you should login to WordPress.com using the login form at the top left of the http://wordpress.com/ home page. After you login, you’ll see a gray admin bar along the top of all WordPress.com web pages. The admin bar has quick links for getting to your account pages, blog dashboard, creating a new post, and more. Click on the My Dashboard link to get to the settings and editing pages for your new blog.
  • If you don’t see a My Dashboard link, then you have probably created a username-only account, and you can go to http://wordpress.com/signup/ again to add a blog to your account.
Now that you’ve found the dashboard for your blog, you may want to customize the blog title and tagline. You can do that by clicking Settings on the left menu. See the General Settings help page for more details about what you can change there.


Why Blog? How will students benefit from creating blogs?

Articles


"The educated blogger: Using weblogs to promote literacy in the classroom" by David Huffaker
"Coming of Age: An Introduction to the New World Wide Web," Terry Freedman et al.
"Best Practices from Clarence Fisher" by Vicki Davis, teacher
"Learning from Blogs" and Blogs and Pedagogy by Anne Davis, professor at Georgia State University
"Blogs = Invitations into Lives" Clarence Fisher, teacher
"People who care blog" Vicki Davis, Teacher
"Personal Learning Networks: Blogs as Webs of Connected Learning" Miguel Guhlin, Director of Instructional Technology and edu-blogger
Remediation, Genre, and Motivation: Key Concepts for Teaching with Weblogs, Brooks, Nichols, and Priebe.
Moving to the Public: Weblogs in the Writing Classroom, Lowe, and Williams.
The Benefits and Concerns of the Read/Write Web in Education: Blogs, Wikis, RSS, and Social Networks, including .com
English is no longer the predominant language - May 1, 2006
"Tech Tools for Learning" by Will Richardson (Cable in the Classroom's Access Learning, January 2006, p.6-9 [PDF]).
"New Media, New Rules" by Bobbie Eisenstock (Cable in the Classroom Magazine, July/August 2006 [PDF]).
Blogs para educar. Usos de los blogs en una pedagogía constructivista, by Tíscar Lara (Revista TELOS, 65, October-December 2005).
To blog or not to blog...that is the question! , by Claudia Ceraso (The FCE Blog, September 2006 [ppt]))